Common Misconceptions About Fitness

Taking up a new workout routine, or expanding an existing one can have amazing benefits. Fitness is a great path to health, but it can lead to injuries and other concerns when approached with a less-than-eager attitude or through poorly researched fitness techniques.

The following are the most common misconceptions about fitness people should be aware of so they can rule out what’s not going to yield the results they want.

Myth #1: You Need to Sweat a Lot to Burn Fat

Some people are heavy sweaters and some aren’t. The amount of sweat the body gives off does not indicate how hard it is working out, or how healthy it is going to get. Many factors like a person’s weight, how hot the temperature is, what type of exercise a person is doing, and biology dictate how much an individual sweats.

When approaching exercise, simply concentrate on moving your body in ways that are enjoyable and challenging. Staying hydrated and keeping the body at a comfortable temperature will help the body to avoid dehydration and issues associated with overexertion.

Myth #2: Stretching After Exercise Helps Muscles Recover Quicker

It’s important to stretch muscles before exercise, but only really needs to be done when it feels comfortable to the individual. There’s no evidence that suggests blood lactate levels (which measure muscle fatigue) are changed at all through stretching, so it is recommended to stretch if the muscles feel like they need it for flexibility, or if it helps one calm down after a workout.

Myth #3: Spending Too Much Time at the Gym

The gym is for people who like to work out at the gym. Many prefer getting healthy exercising on the beach or in the mountains, which can be excellent ways of achieving fitness. It should be noted that people do not need to exert themselves strenuously every day. Muscles need periods of rest to recover, to heal, and to build up strength for more workouts. So, scheduling rest periods in a weekly workout routine allows the body to recover which will yield the best results.

Don’t be Fooled by Common Fitness Misconceptions

Fitness misconceptions can leave a person frustrated with their lack of supposed results, when what would really work for many people is a less-structured and more easy-going approach. Fitness doesn’t have to take over one’s life and for many people, casual exercise can be just enough to get the incredible benefits fitness has on the body. Depending on one’s fitness goals, it is important to note that exercise should be fun, be it should also be challenging.

There is much to learn about fitness and diet and how they both contribute to overall health. Be sure to explore Nutrex Hawaii to find great information and supplements that can assist you in achieving your health goals.


http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/do-you-need-stretch-and-after-exercise


Disclaimer:
The information provided is for educational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified healthcare provider with any questions or concerns about your health. Check with your doctor before beginning any exercise program. Never disregard or delay seeking medical advice because of something you have heard or read in this article or the internet.

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Taking up a new workout routine, or expanding an existing one can have amazing benefits. Fitness is a great path to health, but it can lead to injuries and other concerns when approached with a less-than-eager attitude or through poorly researched fitness techniques.

The following are the most common misconceptions about fitness people should be aware of so they can rule out what’s not going to yield the results they want.

Myth #1: You Need to Sweat a Lot to Burn Fat

Some people are heavy sweaters and some aren’t. The amount of sweat the body gives off does not indicate how hard it is working out, or how healthy it is going to get. Many factors like a person’s weight, how hot the temperature is, what type of exercise a person is doing, and biology dictate how much an individual sweats.

When approaching exercise, simply concentrate on moving your body in ways that are enjoyable and challenging. Staying hydrated and keeping the body at a comfortable temperature will help the body to avoid dehydration and issues associated with overexertion.

Myth #2: Stretching After Exercise Helps Muscles Recover Quicker

It’s important to stretch muscles before exercise, but only really needs to be done when it feels comfortable to the individual. There’s no evidence that suggests blood lactate levels (which measure muscle fatigue) are changed at all through stretching, so it is recommended to stretch if the muscles feel like they need it for flexibility, or if it helps one calm down after a workout.

Myth #3: Spending Too Much Time at the Gym

The gym is for people who like to work out at the gym. Many prefer getting healthy exercising on the beach or in the mountains, which can be excellent ways of achieving fitness. It should be noted that people do not need to exert themselves strenuously every day. Muscles need periods of rest to recover, to heal, and to build up strength for more workouts. So, scheduling rest periods in a weekly workout routine allows the body to recover which will yield the best results.

Don’t be Fooled by Common Fitness Misconceptions

Fitness misconceptions can leave a person frustrated with their lack of supposed results, when what would really work for many people is a less-structured and more easy-going approach. Fitness doesn’t have to take over one’s life and for many people, casual exercise can be just enough to get the incredible benefits fitness has on the body. Depending on one’s fitness goals, it is important to note that exercise should be fun, be it should also be challenging.

There is much to learn about fitness and diet and how they both contribute to overall health. Be sure to explore Nutrex Hawaii to find great information and supplements that can assist you in achieving your health goals.


http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/do-you-need-stretch-and-after-exercise


Disclaimer:
The information provided is for educational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified healthcare provider with any questions or concerns about your health. Check with your doctor before beginning any exercise program. Never disregard or delay seeking medical advice because of something you have heard or read in this article or the internet.

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